Patchwork it out

Little Stitch Blog: Patchwork Curtains

We’ve all embarked on craft projects and part way through questioned a: what on earth we are doing and b: whether we’ll ever get them finished? Nearly a year ago, inspired by my dear friend Vix (the gorgeous Vintage Vixen) and hugely uninspired by other fabric offerings out there, I decided to make some patchwork curtains for our bedroom window. Which also happens to be the largest window in the house.

I’ve not got much experience of patchworking, I believe most people start with smaller project like a cushion cover or a cot quilt. But after much procrastination, swearing, over 300 hundred postcard sized patches later and untold amounts of hours on the sewing machine, yesterday we finally hung our new curtains. And we couldn’t be more pleased.

Little Stitch Blog: Patchwork Curtains

The curtains are made a mixture of cotton-based patches: many of them are from vintage bedding, but there are also pieces of sarong, African tunic, fabric samples, odds and ends left over from other projects and a few pieces cut from modern fat quarters thrown in there. The beauty of the patchwork curtains is, by using reclaimed fabrics, they are practically free.

Little Stitch Blog: Patchwork Curtains

We are immensely happy with them, they make a huge colourful statement in our refurbished bedroom, really complimenting our turquoise paint. They are very joyful, but possibly my favourite thing about them is the ‘stained glass’ window effect they have when the sun shines through them.

So, despite it taking nearly a year and having been ever so close to abandonment so very many times, I am pretty happy with my first patchwork project. But maybe I’ll try something smaller next…

Dress to impress

dresser1

The lack of ‘before’ photos means I’ll never make a good DIY blogger, but I just wanted to share with you what has been taking up most of my spare time this week: Our secondhand 1980s dark wooden kitchen dresser is a fantastic bit of furniture, but the dark colour of the wood meant that was absorbing all the light in our tiny north-facing kitchen. A transformation was needed and after 10 hours of sanding, priming and 3 careful coats of eggshell paint, the dresser got its new green lease of life.

We’re really happy with the result, the kitchen is already a much lighter brighter place. The light green colour compliments our cream kitchen units and the dark green of my beloved ‘Tube’ tiles.

And just to prove it was all my own work, here’s the dresser mid paint, ably assisted by a cat who later had a slight green bottom…

dresser2